THE MODELWARRIOR’S 2-PART GUIDE TO PAINTING A “GROUPE DE MAISONS DETRUITES” – Going the extra mile

The finished product 8

The second part of my painting tutorial deals with making sure my ruined house fits in with my existing collection of Normandy terrain.  With all wargaming over time scenery becomes a bit boring and I like to make sure everything is interchangeable if possible.

The picture below shows a scratch built, walled orchard A4 in size and based upon 3mm plasticard. This allows me to change the facing of the orchard and also to simply lift up the terrain and replace it with something different:

The orchard on the table

So the plan is to build  a plasticard base for the ruined house and make the bases as seamless as possible. The ruined house will never me fixed down but the terrain around it on the plasticard will be.

Step 1:  I stuck down some of Loic Neveu’s walls which I had already painted. Remember, the house will never be stuck down so it can easily be removed for storage:

Mounting on plasticard

Step 2:  A basecoat of brown is painted over the glaring white plasticard. I also added a telegraph pole to fit it with my existing terrain (Editor’s note: I think this is one of 4Ground’s lovely – but terribly fragile – 15mm telegraph poles). I also added some additional rubble so the base blends in a bit better:

A coat of brown

Step 3:  The fun part. I added static grass, a tiny bit of gravel, a tree and some foliage to the walls with PVA glue:

Static grass and tufts

And finally:  Get everything together and get the camera out!

I always use backdrops which are simply photographs taken by me (no special camera) and developed into panoramic matt sheets (roughly 1m by a foot or two). Costs about £20 but it’s well worth it. I simply attach the sheets using clothes pegs to a self built wooden stand at the rear of the boards.

I added a few geese, a farm cart and the odd panzer to enhance the photos. The geese are now glued down and are a permanent part of the terrain (Editor’s question: Love the geese, where are they from?)

I hoped I covered everything in enough detail for everybody and feel free to ask for any more detailed explanations of how anything was done.

Finally thanks again modeldads for the great stuff you post up and allowing me to write an article (Editor’s note: always a pleasure, never a chore!  Thanks for taking the time to document the process.  If anyone else out there is interested in writing tutorials or, perhaps, a book review, please get in touch!)

Enjoy the photos:

 

 

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